Comment from Cheryl Little

The Department of Labor is working to bring greater clarity to the question of who is classified as an independent contractor and who is an employee. Currently, there isnt a universal definition. I appreciate this effort.

The departments proposed a new rule that would established a more straight-forward framework to determine whether a worker should be classified as an employee or as an independent contractor under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

This is an important signal to independent contractors that this administration values the flexible work opportunities on which independent contracts depend.

Californias AB5, the so-called gig law, is killing flexible employment of all kinds. Unfortunately, other states like New York, New Jersey, and Illinois are also considering similar job-killing laws. And Democrats in the U.S. House and Senate just introduced federal legislation that would further constrict independent contractors.

Unions, and the lawmakers they support, want as many workers as possible to be classified as employees, so they can keep pushing for narrow definitions of independent contractors.

This new rule would establish and expand the definition of an independent contractor, thereby protecting them and the flexibility and freedom they value.

Technology has opened the floodgates of nontraditional employment opportunities for Americans. And COVID-19 has opened the eyes of many workers that they can work from anywhere.

The employer-employee model is outdated and lawmakers should not force the American worker back into it. Workers value flexible work now more than ever.

Please continue this process to redefine and clarify who is an independent contractor and an employee. Please continue to establish and expand the definition of an independent contractor, thereby protecting them and the flexibility and freedom they value and need to support themselves and their families.

Comment ID: WHD-2020-0007-0064 | 8-Oct-20

Categorized under Flexibility, Independence

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